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After an intense birthing season, when June first appears on the calendar, I can wipe the sweat from my brow and smile.  All the sheep and goats have had their hooves trimmed and all kids and lambs have been given their CDT shots.  The livestock now spends the summer in the pastures. No more barn duty.  The females and little ones have seven pastures and we move them every five days.  This means when they all return to the first pasture, it will have been thirty days since their last feast in that pasture.  Our best effort in controlling parasites.

This does not mean, however, that we ignore them.  We do random checks for parasites and other problems.  Such as the new dog chewing on ears if she can catch them.

Fiber shows and farmers’ markets have started in most areas. The best sage advice I ever received was to begin selling products in your general area and then branch outward.  Let people in your area know what you are doing and what you might have for sale.  It works.

© William Churchill 2014